MotoCross History

Origins

The first motocross race took place in Camberley, Surrey, England in 1924. The sport then expanded considerably in Great Britain, then in Belgium and France. It gradually gained central Europe and then the United States where it attracted a growing number of practitioners.

Motocross is a mechanical sport.

It is a motorcycle race practised on a closed circuit in rugged terrain.
The circuit includes quagmires, sand, gravel, streams. The relief is very rugged, with mounds, embankments and ditches. The length of the route varies but is generally between 1600 and 4800 m.

The stroke itself is determined either by distance or by duration. The tests usually involve three categories of engines: 500 cm3, 250 cm3 and 125 cm3, plus a sidecar category.
The gear must comply with a number of rules and specifications.

International Expansion

The first motocross event took place in Camberley, Surrey, England in 1924. The sport then expanded considerably in Great Britain, then in Belgium and France. It gradually gained central Europe and then the United States where it attracted a growing number of practitioners.

This initially British sport was internationalised in 1947 with the creation of the Motocross of Nations, annual team race for the various categories mentioned above. The Trophy of Nations, a 250cc team race, was inaugurated in 1961. The first European championship took place in 1952 for the 500 cc and in 1957 for the 250 cc. The 500cc European Championship became the world championship in 1957 and the same goes for the 250cc race in 1962.
A 125cc world championship was created in 1975 and a sidecar world championship in 1980.

In France, the first Motocross races took place under appalling safety conditions, the pilots, mounted on barely modified motorbikes sometimes rolling with a tweed cap and in costume! It was not until 1949 that he attended the first French championship held in a single race with specialised machines. The pioneers of the time have given way to today’s champions Sébastien Pourcel, Yves Demaria and Mickael Pichon. The latter, subscribers to the world podiums, thus demonstrate the high level of the French championship.

After their debut in this championship, many tricolors crossed the Atlantic to go to challenge the Americans in particular in Supercross; Jean-Michel Bayle (champion 250 in 1991), Mickael Pichon (double 125 champions in 1995 and 1996) and Stéphane Roncada (champion 125 in 2000) have triumphed, giving ideas to Sébastien Tortelli, David Vuillemin, Steve Boniface and Eric Sorby and Most recently Christophe Pourcel.